NYO Player Safety

AED/FIRST AID SUPPLIES

  • AED’s and First Aid Supplies are located at the Chastain Park, Sarah Smith and St. John’s locations
  • All coaches have access to supplies. Closets should be open during games.

911

Provide the following information when calling 911:

  • Give the dispatcher the name of the closest access street (ie: West Wieuca for the upper fields; Lake Forrest Road for the lower fields)
  • Make sure all Emergency Access routes are not blocked
  • Have a volunteer meet EMS at the entrance of the park to direct them to the correct location

Concussion Protocol

ANY PLAYER THAT LOSES CONSIOUSNESS OR IS SUSPECTED OF SUFFERING A CONCUSSION WILL BE REMOVED FROM PLAY IMMEDIATELY AND NOT BE ALLOWED TO RETURN TO PLAY.

Heat Illness

Heat cramps→Heat exhaustion→Heat stroke

Heat illness progresses very quickly. If a player is suspected to be suffering from heat cramps or exhaustion: remove from play, give small, slow sips of fluids and monitor closely. The first aid kit located at Wilkin’s Field will have cooling blankets for any athlete or spectator suspected of suffering from heat exhaustion.  

LIGHTNING

1 HORN BLAST= Lighting has been detected in the area. STOP PLAY.

3 QUICK HORN BLASTS= All clear. RESUME PLAY.

When lightning has been detected in the area:

  • All play, practice and hitting in the batting cages are suspended.
  • All players, coaches, umpires, officials and spectators should leave the field and seek shelter immediately.
  • Any team who continues to play during a lighting warning will be asked to leave the premises.

Safe Shelter

  • Sturdy, enclosed structure
  • Fully enclosed vehicle with the windows rolled up

Avoid

  • Open fields
  • Tall, isolated objects (ex: bench under the tree by the small ball field)
  • All metal fences, bleachers and batting cages
  • Unprotected, open areas such as dugouts, pavilions or tents
  • All water fountains or puddles

INCLEMENT WEATHER

To get the latest field status, go to www.nypsorts.com and look at the posting on the top of the homepage.  Updates will be available by 3pm during weekdays.

40 degrees or below = stay off the field.

CONCUSSION SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

Athletes who experience one or more of the signs and symptoms below after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body may have a concussion.

SYMPTOMS REPORTED BY ATHLETE

  • Headache or “pressure” in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Just not “feeling right” or is “feeling down”

SIGNS OBSERVED BY COACHING STAFF

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets an instruction
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes
  • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fallI

IF YOU SUSPECT THAT AN ATHLETE HAS A CONCUSSION, YOU SHOULD TAKE THE FOLLOWING STEPS:

  1. Remove the athlete from play.
  2. Ensure that the athlete is evaluated by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.  Do not try to judge the seriousness of the injury yourself.
  3. Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians about the possible concussion.
  4. Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury.  An athlete should only return to play with the permission from a health care professional, who is experienced in evaluating for concussion.

To learn more, visit www.cdc.gov/concussion

Content Source: CDC’s Head’s Up Program.  Created through a grant to the CDC Foundation from the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE).

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